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"Monster" Mike Schultz, Haas Foundation Grant Highlight 2017 HTEC Conference

GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas, Aug. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Lincoln Educational Services Corporation (NASDAQ: LINC), a national leader in specialized technical training, was proud to have been selected as host of this year's Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) Americas CNC Educators Training Conference. This year's national manufacturing conference was held at Lincoln Tech's Grand Prairie, TX campus in early July. 

 (PRNewsfoto/Lincoln Educational Services)

Three Lincoln Tech campuses around the country feature HTEC training facilities with equipment provided by Haas Automation, the global manufacturer of Computer Numerical Control machining equipment. Lincoln Tech and Haas welcomed hundreds of educators, companies and representatives from the manufacturing industry to the annual HTEC educators' conference, which brings together thought leaders and innovators from the computerized manufacturing field. This year's theme – "Innovative Education Solutions: Taking Back American Manufacturing" – served to highlight the technological advances helping to bring manufacturing jobs and facilities back to the U.S.

Haas Foundation Commits $250,000 to Manufacturing Education and Training
A highlight of the July 10-13 conference was a donation by representatives of the Haas Foundation, who presented a check for $250,000 to the Lincoln Foundation for Education (LiFE). The funds will be allotted to provide scholarships for manufacturing career training at Lincoln Tech campuses in Grand Prairie, TX; Indianapolis, IN; and Mahwah, NJ. Each of these campuses showcases, and trains students on, Haas equipment.

"The Lincoln Foundation for Education is grateful and honored to receive this donation from the Haas Foundation," says Ami Bhandari, LiFE President. "We appreciate the opportunity to support students pursuing computerized manufacturing careers, and in the long run this donation and these scholarships will help our students not only launch those careers, but be better providers for their families as well."

"The entire Haas organization has been a vital partner in promoting training for manufacturing careers," says Scott Shaw, Lincoln's President and CEO. "Since we first started offering CNC manufacturing training almost four years ago, Haas has stood with us every step of the way in making sure our graduates are well-prepared to meet the demands of today's cleaner, comfortable, more efficient manufacturing positions."

According to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly 50,000 computerized manufacturing jobs will need to be filled around the country by 2024. These jobs will be found in facilities manufacturing everything from artificial joints and equipment for the healthcare industry to components for the auto, diesel, aerospace, defense, electronics and construction fields. By partnering with Haas Automation, Lincoln Tech is helping to grow the skilled workforce needed to keep these industries thriving.

"Monster" Mike Schultz serves as keynote speaker
Mike Schultz – athlete, small business owner, and manufacturer – served as the event's keynote speaker.  Schultz, a professional snocross and motocross racer, lost his leg above the knee in a 2008 racing accident. Unsatisfied with the limited mobility provided by standard prosthetic limbs at the time, he designed and built his own – called the Moto Knee and Versa Foot.  Soon after, he started his own company – BioDapt, Inc. – which relies on CNC manufacturing equipment to build the artificial limbs.

"By developing this equipment, we're really allowing other people to get out and live more healthy and active lifestyles," Schultz says. "All of that is done by machining these stainless steel and aluminum parts [on CNC equipment]."

Schultz adds that he's living proof of the importance CNC manufacturing has to many different aspects of society. "Seven months after my injury occurred I was competing at the summer games in Los Angeles on a prosthetic leg that I developed using CNC machines," he says.

Also speaking at the event was Montez King, the Interim Executive Director of the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS). King's presentation spotlighted the value of apprenticeships in setting up students for later success in computerized manufacturing careers.

From inspiring speeches to engaging presentations and exciting hands-on demonstrations, the 2017 HTEC educators' conference provided a valuable forum where industry professionals could share ideas on continuing the rebirth of American manufacturing. Lincoln Tech was proud to host the event, and to partner with Haas to train the next generation of skilled manufacturing professionals.

To learn more about CNC Machining and Manufacturing Technology, as well as all of Lincoln Tech's offerings around the country, visit Lincolntech.edu.

About Lincoln Educational Services Corporation
Lincoln Educational Services Corporation is a leading provider of diversified career-oriented post-secondary education. Lincoln offers recent high school graduates and working adults career-oriented programs in five principal areas of study: automotive technology, health sciences, skilled trades, information technology, and hospitality services. Lincoln has provided the workforce with skilled technicians since its inception in 1946. 

Lincoln currently operates 28 campuses in 15 states under four brands: Lincoln Technical Institute, Lincoln College of Technology, Euphoria Institute of Beauty Arts and Sciences, and Lincoln College of New England. Lincoln also operates Lincoln Culinary Institute in Connecticut.

Contact Information
Lincoln Educational Services Corporation
Peter Tahinos
(973) 736-9340x49233
ptahinos@lincolntech.edu

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